Graphy Publications
Inspiring Innovations & Discoveries
International Journal of Earth & Environmental Sciences Volume 2 (2017), Article ID 2:IJEES-137, 5 pages
https://doi.org/10.15344/2456-351X/2017/137
Research Article
Our Oceans-Our Future: New Evidence-based Sea Level Records from the Fiji Islands for the Last 500 years Indicating Rotational Eustasy and Absence of a Present Rise in Sea Level

Nils-Axel Mörner

Paleogeophysics & Geodynamics, Stockholm, Sweden
Prof. Nils-Axel Mörner, Paleogeophysics & Geodynamics, Stockholm, Sweden; E-mail: morner@pog.nu
20 September 2017; 07 October 2017; 09 October 2017
Mörner NA (2017) Our Oceans-Our Future: New Evidence-based Sea Level Records from the Fiji Islands for the Last 500 years Indicating Rotational Eustasy and Absence of a Present Rise in Sea Level. Int J Earth Environ Sci 1: 137. doi: https://doi.org/10.15344/2456-351X/2017/137

Abstract

Previously, no study in the Fiji Islands had been devoted to the sea level changes of the last 500 years. No serious prediction can be made unless we have a good understanding of the sea level changes today and in the past centuries. Therefore, this study fills a gap, and provides real observational facts to assess the question of present sea level changes. There is a total absence of data supporting the notion of a present sea level rise; on the contrary all available facts indicate present sea level stability. On the centennial timescale, there was a +70 cm high level in the 16th and 17th centuries, a -50 cm low in the 18th century and a stability (with some oscillations) in the 19th, 20th and early 21st centuries. This is almost identical to the sea level change documented in the Maldives, Bangladesh and Goa (India). This seems to indicate a mutual driving force. However, the recorded sea level changes are anti-correlated with the major changes in climate during the last 600 years. Therefore, glacial eustasy cannot be the driving force. The explanation seems to be rotational eustasy with speeding-up phases during Grand Solar Minima forcing ocean water masses to the equatorial region, and slowing-down phases during Grand Solar Maxima forcing ocean waster massed from the equator towards the poles.